Yes, I cooked for Worms

Last night Terry can home, looked around the kitchen and asked “what are you making for dinner”? You can only imagine the look on his face when I told him I was cooking for our new mealworms.  Yes, I Cooked for Worms.  That is a first even for me.  In an effort to raise healthier chicken to eat and sell I started raising mealworms and am also sprouting and raising my own fodder.  I will post pictures of the new fodder system this weekend.ImageImage

Susan 1, Pigs 0

Last year Terry and I spent several frustrating hours trying to load our pigs in the trailer to take to the butcher.  Today I was able to get those girls in the trailer by myself in under 30 minutes.  Thanks to Art Stoup for the use of his loading ramp and for supporting Redbud Farm and Vineyard with great help and advice.  This farm could not produce healthy food for our family and our customers without my amazing husband Terry and his willingness to go out in the cold and dark to do farm chores.

It is time now to think about the food you will put on your family’s table in 2014.  We have started our 2014 Thanksgiving Turkey list so if you want a hand raised pasture turkey fresh from the farm for your Thanksgiving dinner get on the list now.  We are in the process of planning layers for eggs, broiler chickens, turkeys, pork, beef, and produce for 2014.  Contact us so we grow food to meet the needs of your family.  We are also looking at farm poultry harvest days for 2014.  If you are interested in growing your own chicken or turkey and want our support to harvest your flocks contact us so we include you in the scheduling and planning.

Farm Fresh Eggs vs Store Bought Eggs

Are Eggs From Backyard Chickens Better?

from the Backyard Poultry Blog

by Cristian Rojas | August 16, 2013Image

They already look better before and after cracking them, right? But are they really better for you? A study done by MotherEarthNews.com confirmed in 2007 that eggs laid by your own hens at home are not only good looking, but good for you too.

When comparing a standard grocery store egg’s nutritional value (as measured by the USDA) to an average backyard egg, the study gives the latter an advantage:

  • 4 to 6 times as much vitamin D
  • 1/3 less cholesterol
  • 1/4 less saturated fat
  • 2/3 more vitamin A
  • 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids
  • 3 times more vitamin E
  • 7 times more beta carotene

Why the edge? Because backyard chickens have a better diet of organic feed and most importantly…bugs — for real. Chickens not only gorge on chicken feed but the natural environment you provide them will also supply a healthy amount and diversity of little plants, bugs, grasses and leaves that are at the core of a wild chicken diet. Something their industrial peers miss.

Reading this article was so exciting.  I love knowing that raising our own hens for farm fresh eggs is not only fun but that we are helping to grow better food for folks.  Sign up with us to get a regular supply of eggs.